2019 Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 8: Family Photo

George Adam Counce 1901-1986 Collage with background

2019 Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 8: Family Photo

George Adam Counce (1901-1986)

The Fantasy Grandfather:

I have a family reunion photo or two, but I don’t know who is in them, so rather than trying to figure it out, I decided to go with the all of the family photos I have of my Paternal Grandfather. Fortunately, I also know what year they were taken, and put them together in a kind of collage.

George has always been a kind of fantasy figure in my life. When I was a child of about 9 or 10, I had been told that he died. In my child’s mind, I didn’t believe him to be dead. I would have many fantasies about what it might be like to have a grandfather in my life, as both of mine were “dead” either before I was born or shortly before my first birthday.

The Real Grandfather:

Right around my 20th birthday, my “Fantasy Grandfather” came to life. I got a call from my father telling me that he was in the hospital in Lodi, California, with gall stones, and my Grandmother was on the way to help take care of him. I was absolutely ecstatic to find out that I was right my whole life, and that he was, in fact, very much alive. My first husband had just gotten out of the Marine Corps and was about to drag me and our eldest from Twenty-nine Palms, California to Colton, South Dakota. I was adamant that we were going by way of Lodi, California, and San Francisco, California (so I could see my dad). (Only kinda sorta out of the way.) I can honestly say there is a huge difference between the Grandfather of my fantasies and the real deal.

Meeting the Real Deal:

At the time, I had a huge respect for old people (always have), but never really knew how to do much but just sit and listen to them. Problem was, upon meeting him, we did not know each other. He pretty much just learned about me, and didn’t say very much, even when asked. Most of his responses were in the “yes” or “no” variety. In retrospect, I think it was a bit overwhelming for him. I know I had a sudden uncomfortable feeling come over me, and I suspect that I was picking up his vibes in an empathetic way. I knew he had just come home from the hospital and I didn’t want to over do it, so I kept the visit short.

The Story Behind The Story:

According to my Grandmother, My Aunt, and my father…

One day in 1941, my Grandfather walked out the front door like he was going to work at the Garage, and never came back. Allegedly, his sister, no idea of which one it was, told my Grandmother that he was dead. (Note: I say allegedly because I wasn’t there, and this is heresay.)

I later found out from my Uncle and Aunt, that he married a “second time”, (more on that in a minute), an Eva Lucille Hunt. From the obituary that they gave me (and I haven’t found again, yet), it looked to me like they had more children, besides the six that he had with my Grandmother. She died in early 1978, he was in the hospital in the latter part of 1978.

Why Genealogy Research is Important:

Since working on my family tree, I’ve learned that some of my first conclusions, up to seeing Eva’s obituary, were incorrect. I still haven’t been able to find out how my Grandfather was able to marry Eva, as I have found no divorce record of a divorce from my Grandmother. His marriage to Eva took place in Los Angeles, California, two years after I was born. So, unless he married someone else between 1941 and 1960, he remained single (legally) for nineteen years.

I also learned that Eva had been married twice before marrying my Grandfather, and that the children mentioned in the obituary were from her first and second marriage.

I also learned that my Grandfather had been married before he married my Grandmother, so the marriage to Eva was in fact his “third” marriage.

My Grandfather and My Grandmother Together, Again:

I am not aware of my Grandmother remarrying at any time after my Grandfather disappeared, until they remarried on Christmas Eve, 1978. I have to say that it’s kind of weird to see your Grandparents marriage on the same page of the State Records as your own marriage.

Marriage records of Grandparents and Me

George and Julia remained married until George died on 16 Oct 1986, for a combined total of 20 years together.

Posted in #52Ancestors, #WikiTree, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Ancestry, Blog, Connections, Family, Family Roots, Family Tree Searches, Genealogy, Interests, Life's Adventures, Overcoming Obstacles, Uncategorized, WikiTree | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2019 Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 7: Love

Love

2019 Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 7: Love

(Note: I skipped week six in my blogs due to the fact that what was a Surprise (Week 6 Theme), while not a surprise to other family members that informed me, I am not sure that living family members would appreciate me making that information public.)

What is Love?

We know we feel it, but describing it is a task that even articulate poets struggle with. See the definition in Merriam-Webster Dictionary, if like me, you prefer to stay close to the definition found in the Dictionary. Love between couples has changed greatly, from my observations of the last 60 years.

Love in 1799?

I’m sure that love was a very different thing to people in 1799 than it is in 2019. However, in as much as I didn’t live back then I can’t with any certainty say what is was like back then, or how our ancestors behaved. So picking something for this topic was a little difficult for me, so I decided to combine the WikiTree Bio Builder’s Challenge for February and this blog and found two relatives that were married on Valentine’s Day in 1799.

The Husband & Wife:

Manasseh Miner was born 13 Jun 1755, in Stonington, New London County, Connecticut. According to the WikiTree “Relationship Finder” I have no connection to him. According to Ancestry.com he is the grand-nephew of wife of 1st cousin 2x removed of wife of 1st cousin 6x removed.

Hannah Haley was born 15 Apr 1756, also in Stonington. According to the WikiTree “Relationship Finder”, Hannah and I are 3rd Cousins 7 times removed. According to Ancestry.com she is the wife of grand-nephew of wife of 1st cousin 2x removed of wife of 1st cousin 6x removed. (Why Ancestry doesn’t simplify this is beyond me, but WikiTree is better connected to other family members than my tree on Ancestry.com, so, at the moment, however it’s phrased, both are true.)

Why Marry?

In as much as the first US Census wasn’t until 1790, the following is purely in part conjecture and an exploration of possibilities on my part, at this time. Some of my “theories” are based on the following statistics, that I could find. For example, in 1790 the total population of ALL of New London County was 33,200. In 1800 the population of Stonington was 5,437.

It is possible that Manasseh and Hannah grew up close to each other, and saw each other on a regular basis, could have fallen in love and got married. But, it is also possible that it was a marriage of convenience and familiarity, and had nothing to do with love in the beginning at all. During this time frame, much of Stonington was still a farming community, and often couples had children to help with the farming. The actual reason this couple married, is not and cannot, at this time, be known. If anyone has family information handed down, I welcome learning of it.

Valentine’s Day 1799

On 14 Feb 1799, Manasseh and Hannah were married in the First Congregational Church of Stonington, by Rev Nathaniel Eells, with Thomas Miner Jr and James Dean being the witnesses to the event.[1][2][3][4][5]

This marriage produced the following children:

Twin daughter and son; b. 24 Nov 1779; d. ? (No Profile Created)[3]

Amos Miner; b. 25 Jul 1781[3]

Isaac Denison Miner; b 21 Mar 1783[3]

Manassah Miner; b Jan 29, 1785[3]

Ephraim Miner; b. 28 May 1787[3]

Lydia Miner; b. 15 Jun 1792, d. 24 Dec 1794[3]

Son b. 15 Jun 1792; d. 15 Jun 1792 (No Profile Created)[3]

John Miner; b. 24 Dec 1794[3]

Thomas Miner; b. 17 Feb 1798[3]

Israel B. Miner; b. ? d. ? (No Profile Created)[3]

Until Death Do Us Part:

Manasseh died 25 Aug 1837, Hannah died 4 Sep 1801. In all they were married for 38 years. Both are buried in Miner Cemetery, also known as Thomas Miner Cemetery #17, in Stonington.[6][7]

 

1 Connecticut Vital Records to 1850: New Horizons Genealogy (Online Database); From original typescripts, Lucius Barnes Barbour Collection, 1928. Retrieved from: http://dunhamwilcox.net/barbour/stonington_barbour_h-i.htm

2 Wheeler, Richard A. (1875); History of the First Congregational Church, Stonington, Connecticut, 1674-1874; With The Report of Bi-Centennial Proceedings, 03 Jun 1874; With Appendix Containing Statistics of the Church.; T.H. Davis and Company, Norwich, Connecticut; PG 262 (baptism), PG 257 (marriage); Retrieved from: https://archive.org/stream/historyoffirstco00whee#page/262/mode/2up

3 Miner, John Augustus (1981), Thomas Minor Descendants 1608-1981; John Augustus Miner, Compiler and Publisher, Trevett, Maine; PG 89, #423; Retrieved from https://www.familysearch.org/library/books/records/item/212847-thomas-minor-descendants-1608-1981?viewer=1&offset=0#page=59&viewer=picture&o=info&n=0&q=

4 Wheeler, Richard Anson; (1900); History of the Town of Stonington, County of New London, Connecticut, from its first settlement in 1649 to 1900; Press of the Day Publishing Company, New London, Conn.; PG 408, #13 & 471-472, #173; Retrieved from https://archive.org/stream/historyoftownofs00whee_1#page/n429/mode/2up

5 Brown,Cyrus Henry (1907); Brown genealogy of many of the descendants of Thomas, John, and Eleazer Brown Vol 1; The Everett Press Company, Boston; PG 155, #1106a ; Retrieved from https://archive.org/stream/browngenealogyof00brow#page/154/mode/2up

6 Find A Grave, database and images (findagrave.com : accessed 28 February 2019), memorial page for Manassah Miner (13 Jun 1755–25 Aug 1837), Find A Grave: Memorial #76593163, citing Miner Cemetery, Stonington, New London County, Connecticut, USA ; Maintained by Linda Mac (contributor 47062703).

Find A Grave, database and images (findagrave.com : accessed 21 February 2019), memorial page for Hannah Haley Miner (15 Apr 1756–4 Sep 1801), Find A Grave: Memorial #76593456, citing Miner Cemetery, Stonington, New London County, Connecticut, USA ; Maintained by Linda Mac (contributor 47062703) .

Posted in #52Ancestors, #WikiTree, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Ancestry, Blog, Connections, Family, Family Roots, Family Tree Searches, Free Stuff, Genealogy, Hobbies, Interests, Life's Adventures, Overcoming Obstacles, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2019 Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 5: At the Library

Wheeler School and Library

Wheeler School and Library, North Stonington, New London, Connecticut (via Google Maps)

My apologies, I have some catching up to do:

Week 5 of #52Ancestors: At The Library

Being mostly home bound I really don’t get to the library as much as I use to, so I was a bit stumped on this particular Weeks Challenge, but then I remembered that my fourth cousin five times removed, Major Dudley R. Wheeler has a Library in his memory. The Wheeler Library of North Stonington, was built in his memory and was (is?) “perpetuated through the benevolence of his children, Edgar, Jennie and Dwight Wheeler” (History of Stonington“, pg 648, #191). The Library is located at 101 Main Street, in North Stonington, Connecticut.

About Why The Library is in Memorial to Major Dudley R. Wheeler:

According to the author of “History of Stonington“, he

“…was one of the most prominent and successful merchants of North Stonington…” and “…gave liberally for his town and church.”

 

 

 

 

Posted in #WikiTree, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Ancestry, Blog, Connections, Family, Free Stuff, Genealogy, Interests, Life's Adventures, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2019 Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 4: I’d Like to Meet

richard anson wheeler

Richard Anson Wheeler (1817-1904)

The Ancestor I Would Most Like to Meet

Normally I spout off about what I’ve learned about an ancestor, hopefully brag about their achievements (I’m very proud of my family, for the most part), try to tell you something about them. This isn’t going to be one of those, though with Judge Richard Anson Wheeler, there is plenty to brag about. Author, Judge, American Genealogist, among others. But that isn’t why I want to meet this man.

Honestly, which ancestor I would most like to meet can vary, depending on which family member’s #WikiTree profile I’m trying to locate records on so that I can construct a biography that gives more than the date they were born, married and died. But there have been numerous times I find myself talking out loud to my 2nd Cousin, 5 times removed. This week in particular.

Why is Richard Anson Wheeler the Ancestor I Would Most Like to Meet?

Cousin Richard is a well known American Genealogist, who wrote “History of Stonington”, among others, where he includes the genealogy of most of the families of Stonington, Connecticut. And it is this book that sometimes has me banging my head on my keyboard. This week in particular as a particular relative of ours is recorded in the book (and others) as Martha, but all of the records (marriage, children’s birth records, death, tombstone) all say her name is Thankfull. I’ve been making myself, and a couple of other people, crazy trying to figure out where either Martha or Thankfull came from, why are they different. Thankfull is not a normal nickname for Martha of that time period, nor were middle names yet common in the families as of yet.

Of course this isn’t the only question I have for him, there are hundreds, but I can honestly say that as of this moment, Cousin Richard is the one Ancestor I most would like to meet. Next week I’m sure it will be another of my ancestors.

 

Posted in #WikiTree, 52 Ancestors for 52 Weeks, Ancestry, Connections, Family, Family Roots, Family Tree Searches, Free Stuff, Interests, Life's Adventures, Overcoming Obstacles, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2019 Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 3: Unusual Name

The Subject of this Weeks #52Ancestors Challenge:

Ziba “Vyiby” Burrows (1771-1771)

Ziba Burrows was my 2nd Cousin, Six Times Removed. He was born in May of 1771, and all that is known, from the records that could be found was that he died in infancy. The year of his death is presumed, based on the fact that the only information about his mother, Priscilla (Baldwin) Burrows death is the year of 1771, according to available information. Because Ziba was born in May, she had to have died sometime after his death. Ziba’s father, Hubbard Daniel Burrows, was killed in the battle at Fort Griswold, Groton Heights, Connecticut, 06 Sep 1781. See Ziba, Priscilla and Hubbard’s #WikiTree profiles for the references.

Ziba Is So Unusal To Me, I Had to Research It

I had to turn to my old friend Google Search to look this one up. What I discovered, via Wikipedia is Ziba was a man that was a servant of King Saul in the second book of Samuel. There is a little bit more about this man in the Wikipedia Article.

I also discovered that at some point this became a girls name, though I can’t remember where I found that information.

Where Did ”Vyiby” Come From?

As noted in the first section of the blog, all references are listed in the biographies (links included), however, in Ziba’s WikiTree Profile, I neglected to add the references for my second note:

“In History of Stonington by Richard Anson Wheeler and Daughters of the American Revolution Magazine, Volumes 48-49 have Hubbard Baldwin BurrowsSeth BurrowsJohn Baldwin Burrows, but has “Vyiby Burrows” listed as the 3rd child, with no date of birth, and unmarried, but no Ziba listed. The Baldwin Genealogy and Robert Burrows and descendants, 1630-1974 have Ziba listed, but no Vyiby listed. This leads me to believe they are the same person. If this turns out to not be the case in the future, Ziba’s profile will need to be fixed and if desired a separate profile for Vyiby created.

My reason for not including those two references is because they do not include Ziba, and while I think they are the same person, I haven’t been able to find documentation to back that up.

Posted in #WikiTree, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Ancestry, Blog, Connections, Family, Family Roots, Family Tree Searches, Free Stuff, Genealogy, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

2019 Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: Week 2: Challenge

edwin allen (1811-1891)

Edwin Allen (1811-1891)

This week I have chosen Edwin Allen (1811-1891), as my ancestor to write about, because he and his family have definitely presented me with some interesting challenges, and this is where the Allen Family enters into my family tree.

Allen Family Origins

There are many Allen Family lines and honestly, they are proving to be difficult for most Genealogists to separate/connect. Edwin Allen proved to be an extreme challenge in the beginning because, I adopted this WikiTree profile back in October 2018, when the only clues it had were his name and his wife, Ruth Babcock Noyes (1809-1861), who is my 4th Cousin, 4 times removed. Because I’m living on an extremely limited budget, I have to use the one resource I pay for (Ancestry) and all the free resources that I can get my hands on. Finding free books on the Allen Family, and this particular Allen Line proved to be extremely difficult, at least in the beginning. Honestly, I still haven’t found a free one on this line specifically, but I did find family members in other genealogical books. I did also join the ALLEN Genealogy Of New England group on Facebook, which proved to be very helpful.

Tackling This Challenge

Because I had virtually no information on Edwin Allen, I had to no clues coming up in Ancestry, so I tried starting with his wife, Ruth Babcock Noyes, Daughter of Joseph Noyes (1758-1847) and Elizabeth Babcock (1775-1846). Ancestry gave me the hint “Babcock gen. by Stephan Babcock. New York, 1903. (30,640p.): 448”, so I went to Archive.org and plugged in “Babcock Genealogy. I was able to find “Babcock Genealogy” by Stephen Baldwin (1903). This turned out to be my springboard into this Allen Line. Now I had one of the children of Edwin and Ruth and he turned out to be a Rhode Island Notable, Former Lt Governor, Edwin Robinson Allen, who’s WikiTree profile I had the privilege of creating from scratch.

In finding out information on Edwin Robinson Allen, I found information on his father, Edwin, though not much. I learned that Edwin was an inventor through ”Men of Progress: Biographical Sketches and Portraits of Leaders in Business & Professional Life in the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations”. I also found the names of his brothers, Edward Tracy Allen and Charles Noyes Allen, so now I had Edwin’s children. (Note: I’m still researching Charles).

With Edwin being an inventor of a particular wood work that had to do with a particular font, I thought perhaps he might be included in ”Men of Progress: Biographical Sketches and Portraits of Leaders in Business & Professional Life in & of the State of Connecticut”, but, alas, he was not included in that. So I was still thinking, the fact that he was an inventor and it was worth mentioning in one book, he should be mentioned somewhere else. I decided then to see if I could find a history on Windham Connecticut, that might give me a better clue about this man of mystery. I did find more in ”History of Windam County, Connecticut, with Illustrations”, though not necessarily genealogically significant, and really not too much more than I already knew, I did find something. That was encouraging. I did learn that Edwin was the son of Amos Denison Allen (1774-1855).

I also found a hint on Ancestry that Edwin married a Sarah R Chilcoat as his second wife, and they had two children, Frank C. Allen and Addie Allen. I haven’t been able to find a marriage date, but this information was gleaned from US Census Records.

I finally found a couple of books today that were really helpful, but almost every reference had to be found through the Allen wives lines. Something is better than nothing.

Challenge Complete.

Edwin and his family and the challenge of finding him and information on him proved to be very challenging. But, I love investigating and looking for clues, and today, I completed the rest of Edwin’s biography on WikiTree, and my search was rewarded, even though it took me a couple of weeks (with the holidays in between) to finally get it done.

Which family member has been your challenge?

Posted in #WikiTree, 52 Ancestors for 52 Weeks, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Ancestry, Blog, Connections, Family, Family Roots, Family Tree Searches, Free Stuff, Genealogy, Interests, Life's Adventures, Overcoming Obstacles, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks in 2019 Challenge-Week 1: Firsts

Happy New Year and Happy Birthday Meme

Didn’t Do as Well on the 2018 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge As I Had Hoped or Planned to.

I hope to do better with this years challenge. Onward we go:

Kicking Off Week 1: Firsts, going with born on the first day of the year.

I picked an easy one for kicking this off because I’m hoping that in by not trying to do so much, I will get myself off to a better start this year. For this weeks Challenge I picked one of my five ancestors born on the first day of the year, Thankful Wheeler.

About Thankful Wheeler:

Thankful was born on a Monday, New Years Day, 01 Jan 1741/2, the third daughter, 5th child of Jonathan Wheeler and Esther Denison. She was born in Stonington, New London, Connecticut.[1][2][3]. She was baptized on 14 Mar 1741/2, in the First Congregational Church of Stonington, by Reverend Ebenezer Rossiter.[4]

Thankful is the Great Great Granddaughter of the Thomas Wheeler who came from England, ended up in Lynn, Massachusetts then migrated to Stonington, Connecticut and helped in the building up of the town.

For reasons unknown at this time Thankful did not marry and died at the age of 31 on 23 Oct 1773, and is buried in Jonathan Wheeler Cemetery #24, in Stonington.[5][6][7]

It Should Be Noted:

Both ”History of the Town of Stonington, County of New London, Connecticut, from its first settlement in 1649 to 1900” and “The Genealogical and Encyclopedic History of the Wheeler Family in America” have her year of death listed as 1775, but there is no evidence to support this, but there is evidence to support 1773 as the year that Thankful died.

  1.  Connecticut Vital Records to 1850: New Horizons Genealogy (Online Database); From original typescripts, Lucius Barnes Barbour Collection, 1928. Retrieved from: http://dunhamwilcox.net/barbour/stonington_barbour_w1.htm
  2. ↑ 2.0 2.1 Wheeler, Richard Anson; (1900); History of the Town of Stonington, County of New London, Connecticut, from its first settlement in 1649 to 1900; Press of the Day Publishing Company, New London, Conn.; PG 650 #345; Retrieved from https://archive.org/stream/historyoftownofs00whee_1#page/n671/mode/2up
  3. ↑ 3.0 3.1 Wheeler, Albert Gallatin : American College of Genealogy (1914). The Genealogical and Encyclopedic History of the Wheeler Family in America; PG 304, #3942; Retrieved from: https://archive.org/details/genealogicalency00amer/page/304
  4.  Wheeler, Richard A. (1875); History of the First Congregational Church, Stonington, Connecticut, 1674-1874; With The Report of Bi-Centennial Proceedings, 03 Jun 1874; With Appendix Containing Statistics of the Church.; T.H. Davis and Company, Norwich, Connecticut; PG 225; Retrieved from: https://archive.org/stream/historyoffirstco00whee#page/224/mode/2up
  5.  Find A Grave, database and images (findagrave.com : accessed 02 January 2019), memorial page for Thankful Wheeler (1 Jan 1742–23 Oct 1773), Find A Grave: Memorial #10081855, citing Jonathan Wheeler Cemetery, Stonington, New London County, Connecticut, USA ; Maintained by Find A Grave (contributor 8).
  6.  Connecticut Deaths and Burials, 1772-1934, database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F7VD-C52 : 9 February 2018), Thankful Wheeler, 23 Oct 1773; citing , reference p 336; FHL microfilm 3,364.
  7.  Hale Collection of Cemetery Records: New Horizons Genealogy (Online Database); From original typescripts via: http://www.rays-place.com/cemeteries/stoington-24.htm
Posted in 52 Ancestors for 52 Weeks, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, Ancestry, Blog, Connections, Family, Family Roots, Family Tree Searches, Free Stuff, Genealogy, Interests, Life's Adventures, Overcoming Obstacles, Uncategorized, WikiTree | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment